Women in ministry

This is written by Jonathan Woodard, as a guest blogger to give Pastor Chuck a much-needed break from his faithfully-written blogs.

Destiny Family Center is blessed to have some amazing women in platform ministry. We are so grateful for their vital ministry (as well as the men’s and the many women in valuable non-platform ministry).  Destiny is part of a fellowship of churches that believe  we should encourage women should obey a call to serve in any of the five-fold ministry if God calls them to that. (see Scriptural basis at this link)

Here is a video of our US General Superintendent interviewing a female senior pastor from Kentucky. God grew the church from 40 to 350 within 4 1/2 years during her senior pastorate there.  Praise the Lord!

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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6 thoughts on “Women in ministry

  1. We agree on Sola Scriptura, and the motivation is not postmodern, but walking in the Scriptural liberty found in Christ and the needs of the harvest.
    The article you read stated that Junia was a female apostle in Romans 16:7.
    There are many instances in the Scripture addressed to "man" which apply to both men and women, knowing that in Christ, there is neither male or female. The qualifications for elder do not disqualify women from ministry.

    Here's some snippets from http://enrichmentjournal.ag.org/200102/082_paul.c
    "In any case, here Paul also forbade women to "teach," something he apparently allowed elsewhere (Romans 16; Philippians 4:2,3). Thus he presumably addressed the specific situation in this community. Because both Paul and his readers knew their situation and could take it for granted, the situation which elicited Paul’s response was thus assumed in his intended meaning."

    "Joel explicitly emphasized that when God poured out His Spirit, women as well as men would prophesy (Joel 2:28,29). Pentecost meant that all God’s people qualified for the gifts of His Spirit (Acts 2:17,18), just as salvation meant that male or female would have the same relationship with God (Galatians 3:28)."

    Slaves can be saved and also receive gifts for ministry equally, so can Gentiles, so can women.

    article by Dr. George Wood, who was in the video interview: http://enrichmentjournal.ag.org/200102/008_explor
    article by Dr. Stanley Horton on female prophets http://enrichmentjournal.ag.org/200102/080_prophe

  2. Hmm. I don’t think my comments will be very popular here, but this needs to be said…

    The Article did a nice job of dodging the clear meaning of 1 Timothy 2:12.

    See http://covenant-theology.blogspot.com/2008/11/egalitarianism-theology-of-rebellion.html

    How many Apostles were women? None
    What are the qualifications of a elder in the church? Men, husbanc of one wife?

    Women are honored by God, and are encouraged to teach younger women. But the Scripturea are clear. A woman is not to exercise authoruty over a man in the church, nor is she to preach in the setting of public worship, but “keep silent”.

    Don’t get caught up in the postmodern abandonment of God’s clear Word.

    Sorry guys, but Sola Scriptura

  3. Hey Jonathan,

    Thanks for the reply, and for the civility in our disagreement.

    That said, there are some major flaws in the article, and you pointed to some.

    1.) “The article you read stated that Junia was a female apostle in Romans 16:7”.

    The article was wrong. Romans 16:7 does not state the Junia was an apostle, or for that matter, even a church leader. Some translations say that she was “of note among the apostles”, clearly meaning that the was “well known by the apostles”. For that matter, it’s not even clear that Junia was a woman, since the original Greek “Iounian” could also be translated “Junias” (a male name). as some early transcripts support.

    In any case, there were only 14 Apostles (the original 12, plus Mattias and Paul). The term “apostle” here referring to the church office, not the generic term that many try to confuse others with.

    2.) “in Christ, there is neither male or female”

    Another misused text. Taken to it’s logical extreme, this sort of exegesis could be used to support gay marriage (Don’t laugh, I’ve seen this done). The passage is clearly used to emphasize importance of different people in Christ, there salvation not being dependent on social standing. The passage is not meant to blur the clear distinction between men and women, and thus their qualification for church office or teaching in public ministry.

    3.) “In any case, here Paul also forbade women to “teach,” something he apparently allowed elsewhere (Romans 16; Philippians 4:2,3). Thus he presumably addressed the specific situation in this community. Because both Paul and his readers knew their situation and could take it for granted, the situation which elicited Paul’s response was thus assumed in his intended meaning.”

    Romans 16 does not teach that women are allowed to teach. There are many ways that a woman can (and should) be “workers in Christ Jesus” without holding an ordained office or teaching in public worship. That same is true with Philippians 4, and there are many ways to “labor…in the gospel” without holding an ordained office or teaching in public worship.

    The clearest passage regarding women teaching is 1 Timothy 2:12, and Paul really leaves no ambiguity in his statement. To suggest that Paul was “presumably addressed the specific situation in this community” is presumptuous indeed. Especially when Paul was clearly addressing Timothy in regards to “all people” (without distinction) (v. 1, 4, 6). Paul goes on to suggest that “in every place the men should pray” (v.8). Does that apply only to the specific situation in Timothy, or to men in every place? On what basis, then, would anyone suggest that Paul suddenly shift gears and applies vs. 12 to “a specific situation”. Certainly not sound biblical exegesis.

    4.) “Joel explicitly emphasized that when God poured out His Spirit, women as well as men would prophesy (Joel 2:28,29).”

    Another misused passage, though not quite as clear, since preaching is a form of prophesying. Remember, when Peter was citing this passage, he was applying it to what had just happened on the day of Pentecost. There were 3,000 people with him, and yet he was the only one “preaching”. No one else was preaching, and no women had been ordained to church office. It’s best to let the Apostles apply their own meaning to a passage rather than try to make it say something that it doesn’t.

    5.) “Slaves can be saved and also receive gifts for ministry equally, so can Gentiles, so can women.”

    Gifts for ministry does not necessarily entail preaching or ordination for church office. Over and over again, those offices are strictly limited to men. In 1 Timothy 2:12, God left no wiggle room for interpretation, nor did He contradict Himself on the other passages that we just dealt with.

    Let me ask you, as I have often done Regarding this passage. “et’s suppose, just for a second, the Paul had actually meant that he does “not permit a woman to teach or to exercise authority over a man”, and that “she is to remain quiet”. How else could he have expressed that sentiment any clearer than he did here?

  4. Thanks Jonathan and Puritan Lad for this active discussion. I am a woman and I do believe that women aren't to exercise authority over a man in the church.